FAST project contributes to Digital Music Research Network Workshop 2017

FAST project contributes to Digital Music Research Network Workshop 2017

The Fusing Audio and Semantic Technologies project (FAST) contributed four papers to the Digital Music Research Network workshop held at Queen Mary University of London last month.

The Digital Music Research Network aims to promote research in the area of Digital Music, by bringing together researchers from UK universities and industry in electronic engineering, computer science, and music. This was the 12th one-day workshop to be held by the network.

The five-year EPSRC FAST project brings the very latest technologies to bear on the entire recorded music industry, end-to-end, producer to consumer, making the production process more fruitful, the consumption process more engaging, and the delivery and intermediation more automated and robust.

The four FAST papers accepted for the workshop were:

  • Alan Chamberlain, David De Roure, Steve Benford, Chris Greenhalgh and Adrian Hazzard, Maria Kallionpää, David Weigl (pictured above), Kevin Page and Pip Willcox "FAST forward to the semantics of design for musical performance", DMRN+ 12, Digital Music Research Network, 19th December, London, UK.
  • Alan Chamberlain, Alessio Malizia and David De Roure (2017) "An agent on my shoulder: AI, privacy and the application of human-like computing technologies to music creation", DMRN+ 12, Digital Music Research Network, 19th December, London, UK.
  • Alan Chamberlain, Maria Kallionpää and Steve Benford (2017) "The art and 'science' of opera: Composing, staging & designing new forms of interactive theatrical performance", DMRN+ 12, Digital Music Research Network, 19th December, London, UK.
  • Iain Emsley, Alan Chamberlain and David De Roure (2017) "Hearing the humanities: Sonifying Steele's Shakespeare", DMRN+ 12, Digital Music Research Network, 19th December, London, UK.